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Publications & Reprints

Prices for publications and shipping costs are listed below. You may order publications by phone by calling BIRC at (510) 524-2567 or print out a copy of our order form (online ordering is not yet available) and return it, with payment, to BIRC, P.O. Box 7414, Berkeley, CA 94707. BIRC members may deduct 15% from the cost of their order (not including shipping). Questions? Please phone us, or email us at birc@igc.org. We appreciate your support of our publications.


BIRC Special Publications


IPM Alternatives to Methyl Bromide. 52 pp. $20 postpaid
2013 Directory of Least-Toxic Pest Control Products. Bio-Integral
Resource Center, Berkeley, CA. 52 pp. $15 postpaid
IPM for Schools--A How-To Manual. $45 + $5 postage and handling
IPM for Termites. Includes non-toxic termite treatments and a special
baiting supplement. 62 pp. $15 + $3 postage and handling

The Gardener's Guide to Common Sense Pest Control. Daar &Olkowski, 303 pp. $19.95 postpaid

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Least-Toxic Pest Management Series
(add $2 postage and handling except as indicated)
(see also Reprint List below)

Baiting Cockroaches. 8 pp. $6
Clothes Moths and Carpet Beetles. 15 pp. $6
Dust Mites, Cockroaches and Asthma. 15 pp. $6
Fabric and Paper Pests. 18 pp. $6
Greenhouse and Indoor Plants. 62 pp. $12 + $2.50 postage and handling
IPM for Cockroaches. 16 pp. $6
IPM for Fleas. 12 pp. $6
IPM for Flies. 24 pp. $8.00 + $2 postage and handling
IPM for Lawns. 70 pp. $12 + $2.50 postage and handling.
IPM for Mice. 12 pp. $6
IPM Reduces Pesticides, Cockroaches and Asthma. 8 pp. $6

Managing Pest Birds. 7 pp. $6
Managing Head Lice Safely. 15 pp. $6
Managing Pest Rats. 11 pp. $6
Poison Oak and Ivy. 8 pp. $6
Rethinking the American Lawn. 8 pp. $6
Stopping the Cat Flea. 16 pp. $6
Stopping Pest Ants. 20 pp. $6
Stopping Rat Damage. 11 pp. $6
Stopping Slugs and Snails. 16 pp. $6
Spiders, Brown Recluse and Black Widow. 7 pp. $6
Tick Control. 25 pp. $8
Wood-damaging Pests. 90 pp. $12 + $2.50 postage and handling.

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Integrated Vegetation Management
Technical Bulletins (Weeds!)
(each bulletin is $10 plus $2 postage and handling)

Integrated Vegetation Management Guide. 16 pp.
Canada Thistle. 16 pp.
Gorse. 18 pp.
Leafy Spurge. 20 pp.
Purple Loosestrife. 16 pp.
Purple Starthistle. 14 pp.
Scotch, French, & Spanish Broom. 15 pp.
Smooth Cordgrass. 16 pp.
Spotted, Diffuse, & Russion Knapweeds. 19 pp.
Tansy Ragwort. 16 pp.
Yellow Starthistle. 17 pp.

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Publications for Professionals

Biocontrol of Agricultural Pests. 190pp $12 + $3.50 postage and handling.
Biological Control Industry. 14 pp. $8 + $2 postage and handling.
Contracting for IPM Services. 50 pp. $12 + $2 postage and handling.
Delivering IPM Services. 50 pp. $12 + $2.50
Ectomycorrhizae. IPM Practitioner 21(9):1-14. $6 + $2 postage and handling.
IPM Curriculum for Grades 9-12. 200 pp. $25 + $3.50 postage and handling.
IPM Implementation Manual for Landscape Gardeners. 80 pp. $25 + $3.50
postage and handling.
IPM Implementation Manual for Nursery Growers. 80 pp. $25 + $3.50 postage
and handling.
IPM Policy and Implementation. 16 pp. $6 + $2 postage and handling.
IPM for Sustainable Agriculture 81 pp. $12 + $2.50 postage and handling.
Least-Toxic Pesticides. $12 + $2.50 postage and handling.
Model IPM Contract Specifications. 10 pp. $6 + $2 postage and handling.
New biopesticides for IPM and organic production. IPM Practitioner 33(7/8):1-9 $6 + $2 postage and handling

Non-Toxic Weed Control.Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 15(3):4-17  $6 + $2 postage and handling.
Plant Disease Biocontrol and VAM Fungi. IPM Practitioner 21(4):1-9 $6 + $2 postage and handling.
Urban IPM Implementation Package. 56 pp. $20 + $2.50 postage and
handling.
Vegetation Management Manual for Levees and Aquaducts. 100 pp. $25 +
$3.50 postage and handling.
Weed Biocontrol. 19 pp. $8 + $2 postage and handling.
What is IPM? 8 pp. $6 + $2 postage and handling.

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BIRC Reprints
from the IPM Practitioner and Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
(Each reprint is $6 + $2 Postage and Handling)

Public Health

Atrazine, cancer and amphibian decline. IPM Practitoner 24(7):7
Bats, pesticides and white nose syndrome. IPM Practitioner 33(9/10):1-6
Bed bugs bounce back. IPM Practitioner 28(3/4):1-6
Bed bug pheromones and traps. IPM Practitioner 31(5/6):1-8
Brave new world—systemic pesticides and genetically engineered crops. IPM Practitioner 33(3/4):1-9
Can bed bugs carry ebola? IPM Practitioner 34(7/8):10-11
Deer mice spread new hantavirus. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 11(1):13-15
Don't let the bed bugs bite. IPM Practitioner 32(3/4):1-7
Dust mites, cockroaches and asthma. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 15(1):4-19
Ecology and vectorborne disease. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 15(3):3
Feedlots, pathogens and antibiotic pollution. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 22(2/3):5-7
Global warming means more pests. IPM Practitioner 29(9/10):1-8
Glyphosate a probable human carcinogen. IPM Practitioner 34(9/10):4-5
Growing Lyme disease epidemic. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 15(3):6-17
Hantavirus revisited. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 15(3):18-21
IPM reduces pesticides, cockroaches and asthma. IPM Practitioner 31(9/10):1-8
Is Vikane fumigation of structures safe? IPM Practitioner 23(5/6):1-5
Light brown apple moth - crisis of trust. IPM Practitioner 30(3/4):1-6
Mainstream pest management and IPM (green) certification. IPM Practitioner 31(1/2):1-6
Mosquito repellents from plants. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 20(2):4-14
Mosquito repellents from the salad bowl. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 25(2-4):3-10
Mosquito traps. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 19(2):4-13
New IPM methods for bed bugs. IPM Practitioner 34(7/8):1-9

Pesticides and amphibian decline. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 29(1-4):3-13
Pesticides and water quality. IPM Practitioner 24(5/6):10-11
Protecting amphibians from pesticides. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 29(1-4):14-19
Protecting raptors from rodenticides. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 27(1-4):3-9
Risks of the natural world. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 26(1-4):3-14
Stopping head lice safely. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 14(4):15-12
Stopping mosquitos safely. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 16(2):3-18
Stopping the cat flea. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 21(1):3-18
Toxic molds and health. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 18(2):3-11
What's biting me? Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 21(1):3-10
What are you eating? Labeling genetically engineered food (GMOs). IPM Practitioner 34(5/6):1-9
West Nile encephalitis again. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 15(3)

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Horticulture and Garden Protection

Alternative herbicides in turfgrass and organic agriculture. IPM Practitioner 32(5/6):1-8
Antitranspirants as least-toxic fungicides. IPM Practitioner 22(1):1-9
Aspirin, composts, talking plants and reduced systemic resistance. IPM Practitioner 24(5/6):1-9
Bees attracted to neonicotinoids. IPM Practitioner 34(9/10):1-3
Chickens are back in the backyard. IPM Practitioner 33(1/2):9
Composts for a healthy organic garden. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 16(3):3-20
Compost tea for organic farming and gardening. IPM Practitioner 23(9):1-7

Disease-resistant roses. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 14(2):4-6
Garlic as a pesticide. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 15(4):4-12
Greenhouse biological control of western flower thrips. IPM Practitioner
20(8):1-9
Giant knotweed, plant disease protection, and immortality. IPM Practitioner 31(3/4):1-6
Grow pesto for your pests! Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 15(4):13-19
Herbicide-free lawns. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 19(1):3-7
Herding beneficial insects with pheromones and attractants. IPM Practitioner 30(5/6):1-8
IPM for Asian citrus psyllid and Huanglongbing disease. IPM Practitioner 34(1/2):1-7
IPM for the brown marmorated stink bug. IPM Practitioner 34(3/4):1-8
IPM for turfgrass diseases. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
22(1):12-15
IPM for turfgrass insect pests. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 22(1):3-11
IPM methods for orchids and plants indoors-scales, snails, slugs & ants. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 21(3):3-8
Landscape IPM strategies for diseases of ornamentals. IPM Practitioner 27(3/4):1-8
Landscape IPM for spider mites. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 22(2/3):8-10
Least-toxic solutions for houseplants-plant vampires. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 21(3):3-8
Managing fungus gnats on indoor plants. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 22(2/3):11-18

Neem protects ornamentals in greenhouses and landscapes. IPM Practitioner 27(5/6):1-15
Nematodes and lawn care. IPM Practitioner 24(5/6):14-15
New invasives threaten California crops and ornamentals. IPM Practitioner 32(7/8):1-7
Non-toxic fungicides for roses. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 14(2):7-14
Non-toxic weed control. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 15(3):1-17
Pesticides and honey bee colony collapse disorder. IPM Practitioner 30(9/10):1-10
Pesticides and honey bee death and decline. IPM Practitioner 33(1/2):1-8
Plant disease biocontrol and ectomycorrhizae. IPM Practitioner 21(9):1-10
Plant disease biocontrol and VAM fungi. IPM Practitioner 21(4):1-9
Protecting bees, birds, and beneficial insects from neonicotinoids. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 28(1-4):3-19
Protecting pollinators. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 24(1-4):4-14
Organic and IPM management of turfgrass. IPM Practitioner 31(7/8):1-8
Organic control of rose insect and mite pests. Common Sense Pest Control
Quarterly
14(2):15-19
Protect your garden with aspirin and salicylate. Common Sense Pest Control
Quarterly
12(2):16-18
Rethinking the American lawn. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 25(1):3-10
Stopping slugs and snails. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 23(1):4-14
Sudden oak death, local problem or continental threat? Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 18(3):17-21
Urban forest at risk. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 18(3):3-16

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Household and Structural Pests


Alternatives to arsenic treated wood. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 18(1):13-22
A comparison of commercial baiting systems. IPM Practitioner 19(10):10-16
Baits or barriers? Field efficacy of subterranean termite treatments. IPM Practitioner 32(9/10):1-10
Bed bugs bounce back. IPM Practitioner 29(3/4):1-8
Bed bug pheromones and traps. IPM Practitioner 31(5/6):1-8
Beginnings of structural IPM. IPM Practitioner 19(7):1-8
Borates and wood protection. IPM Practitioner 20(3):1-12
Boric acid and household pests. IPM Practitioner 15(2):1-11
Commercial biocontrol for termites. IPM Practitioner 21(10):1-6
Clothes moths and carpet beetles. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 17(1):3-18
Don't let the bed bugs bite. IPM Practitioner 32(3/4):1-7
Dust mites, cockroaches and asthma. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
15(1):4-19
Electro-gun 98% effective against termites. IPM Practitioner 18(2):11
Expanded use of heat treatment. IPM Practitioner 19(7):1-8
Fly traps. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 13(3):5-12
Heat and boric acid in structural IPM. IPM Practitioner 17(5/6):10-11
Heat and IPM for cockroach control. IPM Practitioner 20(2):1-6
IPM for termites: termite baits. IPM Practitioner 25(1/2):1-18
IPM reduces pesticides, cockroaches, and asthma. IPM Practitioner 31(9/10):1-8
Least-toxic roach baits: an IPM success story. IPM Practitioner 24(2):1-10
Lighted and baited mosquito traps. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
12(4):5-11
Living with Africanized bees. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
10(4):5-14
Living with fire ants. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 14(3):5-16
Managing carpenter ants the least-toxic way. Common Sense Pest Control
Quarterly
9(4):9-16
Managing pest yellowjackets. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
14(1):5-14
Mint oil pesticides. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly (16)2:12-20
Mosquito repellents from plants. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 20(2):4-14
Mosquito repellents from the salad bowl. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 25(2-4):3-10
Mosquito traps. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 19(2):4-13
New approach to boric acid ant baits. IPM Practitioner 18(8):1-6
New flea control products: a blessing or curse? Common Sense Pest Control
Quarterly
13(2):5-10
New subterranean termite treatments. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
13(2):13-16
Non-toxic control of drywood termites. IPM Practitioner 21(8):1-10
Orange oil for drywood termites: magic or marketing madness? IPM Practitioner 30(1/2):1-9
Pest control operators and heat treatment. IPM Practitioner 16(2):8
Protecting raptors from rodenticides. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 27(1-4):3-9
Pyrethroid perimeter sprays in structural pest control. IPM Practitioner 33(5/6):1-6
Repellents for nuisance and biting flies. IPM Practitioner 29(7/8):1-8
Sanitation and cockroach bait aversion. IPM Practitioner 27(1/2):1-7
Spiders in the home and garden. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 16(1):3-18
Stopping the cat flea. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 21(2):3-18
Stopping head lice safely. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 14(4):1-19
Stopping pest ants. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 23(2/3):1-20
Thermal pest eradication in structures. IPM Practitioner 28(5/6):1-8
Where are they? New methods for finding termites in structures. IPM Practitioner 26(1/2):1-9

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Urban IPM

Fungicide and fertilizer reduction on golf courses. IPM Practitioner 18(2):5-7
Golf course management of English daisy. IPM Practitioner 20(9):1-7
Golf in the garden, designing permaculture links. IPM Practitioner 24(7):1-6

IPM for elm leaf beetle in Toronto. IPM Practitioner 20(10):1-7
IPM methods successful in public housing. IPM Practitioner 26(7/8):12-13
IPM on golf courses. IPM Practitioner 19(4):1-7
Is Vikane fumigation of structures safe? IPM Practitioner 23(5/6):1-11
Light brown apple moth - crisis of trust. IPM Practitioner 30(3/4):1-6
Rethinking the American lawn. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 25(1):3-10
Safer indoor pest control conference. IPM Practitioner 23(5/6):6-11
School IPM success stories. IPM Practitoner 24(1):5-7
Structural IPM successes at NASA's Ames Research Center. IPM
Practitioner
19(2):1-11
Sustainable urban landscapes and integrated pest management. IPM Practitioner 26(6/7):1-11
Thermal weed management: hot alternatives for urban areas and organic farms. IPM Practitioner 26(5/6):1-9
The urban IPM challenge: San Francisco and beyond. IPM Practitioner 21(3):1-8

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Vertebrates

Bats, pesticides and white nose syndrome. IPM Practitioner 33(9/10):1-6
Deer mice spread new hantavirus. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
11(1):13-15
Integrated rat management. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
20 (1):5-16
Managing pest birds on buildings. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
8(3):6-12
Managing pest rabbits. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 10(1):5-14
Managing problem raccoons. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
8(4):8-13
Managing the house mouse. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 7(4):7-15
Managing urban Canada geese-or the geese that wouldn't leave. Common
Sense Pest Control Quarterly
11(3):5-11
Oh, possum. Managing a primitive pest mammal. Common Sense Pest
Control Quarterly
9(4):5-8
Pesticides and amphibian decline. Commons Sense Pest Control Quarterly 29(1-4):3-13
Protecting amphibians from pesticides. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 29(1-4):14-19
Protecting gardens from deer damage. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
19(3):6-14
Protecting raptors from rodenticides. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 27(1-4):3-9
Rattlesnakes: pests, yet valuable predators. Common Sense Pest Control
Quarterly
10(3):5-12
Stopping gophers and moles. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 17(4):3-21

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Weeds

Alternative herbicides in turfgrass and organic agriculture. IPM Practitioner 32(5/6):1-8
Brave new world—systemic pesticides and genetically engineered crops. IPM Practitioner 33(3/4):1-9
Corn gluten meal: the least-toxic herbicide IPM Practitioner 21(5/6):1-7
Corn gluten meal: weed cover and vegetable seedling survival. IPM Practitioner 23(2):7-9
Herbicide-free lawns. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 19(1):3-7
Improved hot water weed control system. IPM Practitioner 23(1):1-4
Integrated control of leafy spurge. IPM Practitioner 20(7):1-12
Integrated management of roadside vegetation. IPM Practitioner 18(2):1-7
Integrated management of tansy ragwort. IPM Practitioner 23(4):1-8
Integrated management of yellow and dalmation toadflax. IPM Practitioner 29(5/6):1-8
Integrated management of yellow starthistle. IPM Practitioner 21(7):1-10
Integrated weed management of gorse. IPM Practitioner 18(10):1-9
IPM for school lawns. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 13(4):5-13
Managing the blooming algae. IPM Practitioner 18(7):1-11
Managing roadside vegetation without herbicides. IPM Practitioner 23(7):1-8
Managing weeds in broccoli with purslane living mulch. IPM Practitioner 23(10):1-9
Native plants and integrated roadside vegetation management. IPM Practitioner 25(3/4):1-9
New invasives threaten California crops and ornamentals. IPM Practitioner 32(7/8):1-7

Non-toxic weed control. Common Sense Pest Contol Quarterly 15(3):5-15
Sweeping away broom-integrated management for an exotic yellow legume. IPM Practitioner 26(3/4):1-8
Thermal weed management: hot alternatives for urban areas and organic farms. IPM Practitioner 26(5/6):1-9


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Botanical Pesticides

Botanical mosquito repellents. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly
12(4):12-19
Botanical pesticides from Chenopodium. IPM Practitioner 14(2):1-11
Catnip: insect pheromone and repellent. IPM Practitioner 25(5/6):1-8
Fly repellents. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 13(3):13-19
Garilc as a pesticide. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly. 15(4):4-11
Giant knotweed, plant disease protection, and immortality. IPM Practitioner 31(3/4):1-6
Grow pesto for your pests. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 15(4):13-19
Mint oil pesticides. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 16(2):12-20
Mosquito repellents from plants. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 20(2):4-14
Neem allelopathy and root knot nematode. IPM Practitioner 23(4):9-11
Neem protects ornamentals in greenhouses and landscapes. IPM Practitioner 27(5/6):1-15
New botanical pesticides from Chenopodium. IPM Practitioner 28(3/4):1-12
Orange oil for drywood termites: magic or marketing madness? IPM Practitioner 30(1/2):1-9

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Least-Toxic Pesticides

Diatomaceous earth and stored product pests. IPM Practitioner (5/6):1-10
Diatomaceous earth for pest control. IPM Practitioner 19(5/6):1-11
Silica gel for pest control. IPM Practitioner (7):1-11
USP mineral oil versus horticultural oil. IPM Practitioner 14(8):18
Corn gluten meal is the least-toxic herbicide. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 8(4):14-18
Borates and wood protection. IPM Practitioner 20(3): 1-12

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Microbial Pesticides

Aspirin, composts, talking plants and induced systemic resisitance. IPM Practitioner 24(5/6):1-8
Biocontrol and growth promotion with cold tolerant Trichoderma. IPM Practitioner 23(2):1-6
Biofungicides control dollar spot. IPM Practitioner 27(1/2):8
Biological control of postharvest fruit disease. IPM Practitioner 15(5/6):1-11
Compost tea for organic farming and gardening. IPM Practitioner 23(9):1-8
Compost tea:promises and practicalities. IPM Practitioner 27(9/10):1-5
Fungicide and fertilizer reduction on golf courses. IPM Practitioner 18(2):5-7
Insect biocontrol with fungi. IPM Practitioner 25(9/10):1-6
Matching nematodes to target pests. IPM Practitioner 22(2):1-6
Microbial fungicides and fertilizers for turfgrass. IPM Practitioner 22(8):8-12
Microbial pesticides, IPM and the consumer. IPM Practitioner 18(3):1-10
New biopesticides for IPM and organic production. IPM Practitioner 33(7/8):1-9
New microbial pesticides for IPM. IPM Practitioner 18(8):5-10
Microbial pesticides, IPM and the Consumer IPM Practitioner 18(3):1-10
Pathogens in compost tea? IPM Practitioner 27(9/10):6-7
Plant disease biocontrol and ectomycorrhizae.IPM Practitioner 21(9):1-9
Plant disease biocontrol and VAM fungi. IPM Practitioner 21(4):1-9
Spinosad finds a home in organic agriculture. IPM Practitioner 27(7/8)1-9

The avermectins: successful biopesticides. IPM Practitioner 13(5/6):6-15

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Pheromones

Bed bug pheromones and traps. IPM Practitioner 31(5/6):1-8
ESA 2006 annual meeting: special pheromone report. IPM Practitioner 29(7/8):9-14
Managing aphids with pheromones. IPM Practitioner 29(1/2):1-10
Mating disruption for codling moth control. IPM Practitioner 16(5/6):1-12
Mating disruption for the peach twig borer. IPM Practitioner 19(5/6):1-8
Pheromone products and profiles. IPM Practitioner 16(5/6):14-15
Pheromones and non-toxic cockroach control. IPM Practitioner 20(5/6):1-7
Progress and perils in the pheromone industry. IPM Practitioner 16(5/6):13
Phermomones for aphid control. IPM Practitioner 21(1):1-6

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Agricultural Pest Control

Agroecology and sustainable agriculture. IPM Practitioner 26(9/10):1-7
Alternative herbicides in turfgrass and organic agriculture. IPM Practitioner 32(5/6):1-8
Alternatives to methyl bromide in Florida tomatoes. IPM Practitioner 20(4):1-9
Alternatives to methyl bromide in forest nurseries. IPM Practitioner 19(3):1-14
Alternatives to methyl bromide: Trichoderma seed treatments. IPM
Practitioner
15(9):1-7
Antitranspirants as least-toxic fungicides. IPM Practitioner 22(1):1-9
Bats for insect biocontrol in agriculture. IPM Practitioner 18(9):1-6
Bees attracted to neonicotinoids. IPM Practitioner 34(9/10):1-3
Biocontrol and growth promotion with cold tolerant Trichoderma. IPM Practitioner 23(2):1-6
Biocontrol and IPM for the Asian longhorned beetle. IPM Practitioner 22(7):1-5
Biocontrol of mites with midges. IPM Practitioner 19(4):8-9
Biological control of nuisance flies with pupal parasitoids. IPM Practitioner 28(9/10):1-10
Brave new world—systemic pesticides and genetically engineered crops. IPM Practitioner 33(3/4):1-9
Chinese IPM for citrus leafminer. IPM Practitioner 16(10):10-13
Chinese natural enemies of Asian gypsy moth. IPM Practitioner 17(3):1-11
Commercially available biological control agents. IPM Practitioner 25(7/8):1-9
Compost tea for organic farming and gardening. IPM Practitioner 23(9):1-8
Compost tea: promises and practicalities. IPM Practitioner 27(9/10):1-5
Corn gluten meal: weed cover and vegetable seedling survival. IPM Practitioner 23(2):7-9
Evaluating biocontrol. IPM Practitioner 25(8/9):1-4
Fatal attraction - guardians, bankers, trap crops and greenhouse biocontrol. IPM Practitioner 32(1/2):1-8
Fertilizers for organic farming. IPM Practitioner 23(7/8):11-13
Giant knotweed, plant disease protection, and immortality. IPM Practitioner 31(3/4):1-6
Glassy-winged sharpshooter. IPM Practitioner 24(8/9):8
Greenhouse IPM for western flower thrips. IPM Practitioner 17(4):1-11
Herding beneficial insects with pheromones and attractants. IPM Practitioner 30(5/6):1-8
IGRs and stored products. IPM Practitioner 18(5/6):15-17
Insectary plants, intercropping and biological control. IPM Practitioner 24(3):1-11
IPM for Asian citrus pysllid and Huanglongbing disease. IPM Practitioner 34(1/2):1-7
IPM for the brown marmorated stink bug. IPM Practitioner 34(3/4):1-8
IPM for California processing tomatoes. IPM Practitioner 18(4):1-13
IPM for the pickelworm. IPM Practitioner 18(9):8-11
Light brown apple moth - crisis of trust. IPM Practitioner 30(3/4):1-6
Managing aphids with pheromones. IPM Practitioner 29(1/2):1-10

Managing weeds in broccoli with purslane living mulch. IPM Practitioner 23(10):1-9
Matching nematodes to target pests. IPM Practitioner 22(2):1-6
Mating disruption success in codling moth IPM. IPM Practitioner 22(5/6):1-12
Mechanized delivery of beneficial insects. IPM Practitioner 22(4):1-5
Neem allelopathy and the root knot nematode. IPM Practitioner 23(4):9-11
New biopesticides for IPM and organic production. IPM Practitioner 33(7/9):1-9
New invasives threaten California crops and ornamentals. IPM Practitioner 32(7/8)1-7
Nonchemical management of plant-parasitic nematodes. IPM Practitioner 21(2):1-7
Non-toxic fly control and bovine somatropin hormone. IPM Practitioner
19(9):1-4
Pathogens in compost tea? IPM Practitioner 27(9/10):6-7
Pesticides and honey bee colony collapse disorder. IPM Practitioner 30(9/10):1-10
Pesticides and honey bee death and decline. IPM Practitioner 33(1/2):1-8
Plant disease biocontrol and VAM fungi. IPM Practitioner 21(4):1-9
Plant disease biocontrol and ectomycorrhizae. IPM Practitioner 21(9):1-10
Potato aphid monitoring & biocontol in processing tomatoes. IPM Practitioner 22(3):1-7
Predators of the sweetpotato whitefly. IPM Practitioner 16(10):1-9
Protecting bees, birds, and beneficial insects from neonicotinoids. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 28(1-4):3-19
Protecting pollinators. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 24(1-4):4-14
Repellents for nusiance and biting flies. IPM Practitioner 29(7/8):1-8
Stored product biocontrol. IPM Practitioner 18(5/6):13-15
Strip intercropping for biological control. IPM Practitioner 15(2):1-11
Thermal weed management: hot alternatives for urban areas and organic farms. IPM Practitioner 26(5/6):1-9

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Pesticides and Policy


Atraxine, cancer and amphibian design. IPM Practitioner 24(7):7
Bees attracted to neonicotinoids. IPM Practitioner 34(9/10):1-3
Brave new world—systemic pesticides and genetically engineered crops. IPM Practitioner 33(3/4):1-9
EcoWise certified: an IPM certification program. IPM Practitioner 28(1/2):11-12
EPA exempts least-toxic pesticides. IPM Practitioner 18:16-17
EPA restricts chlorpyrifos. IPM Practitioner 22(7):8-9
Feedlots, pathogens and antibiotic pollution. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 22(2/3):5-7
Food quality protection act. IPM Practitioner 18(10):10-12
Global warming means more pests. IPM Practitioner 29(9/10):1-8
Glyphosate a probable human carcinogen. IPM Practitioner 34(9/10):4-5
IPM methods successful in public housing. IPM Practitioner 26(7/8):12-13
Labeling of genetically engineered foods. IPM Practioner 22(4):6-7
Last-minute changes in the National Organic Program. IPM Practitioner
20(2):9-10
Light brown apple moth - crisis of trust. IPM Practitioner 30(3/4):1-6
Mainstream pest management and IPM (green) certification. IPM Practitioner 31(1/2):1-6
New proposed rule for organic agriculture. IPM Practitioner 22(5/6):13-14
Pesticides and children. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 10(4):15-20
Pesticides and honey bee colony collapse disorder. IPM Practitioner 30(9/10):1-10
Pesticides and water quality. IPM Practitioner 24(5/6):10-11
Pesticide use in the U.S. IPM Practitioner 26(9/10):8-9
Pesticide synergism. IPM Practitioner 18(9):7
Plant pesticide rules. IPM Practitioner 23(2):11
Preserve organic agriculture. IPM Practitioner 20(4):7-9
Problems with genetically engineered crops. IPM Practitioner 25(5/6):6-11
Protecting raptors from rodenticides. Common Sense Pest Control Quarterly 27(1-4):3-9
Safer indoor pest control conference. IPM Practitioner 23(5/6):9
School IPM success stories. IPM Practitioner 24(1):8
The vinegar brouhaha. IPM Practitioner 25(9/10):7-8

True costs of school IPM. IPM Practitioner 23(1):8
What does organic mean? IPM Practitioner 17(10):9-13

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